Amanda Lash

Dr. Amanda Lash

Research Focus


My primary research interests are in perception, memory, and cognitive aging. I have examined age-related cognitive and perceptual changes, along with the compensatory processes older adults use to account for declines in these systems. My recent research looks at the connection between brain changes and cognitive changes in older adults as it relates to successes and impairments in memory performance. I use neuroimaging to elucidate the neural effects of control processes on memory across young and older adults. The goal of my research is to narrow the gap in our understanding of cognitive aging, with the concurrent aims of theory enhancement and supplying a knowledge base for future development of strategies to benefit memory in adult aging.My primary research interests are in perception, memory, and cognitive aging. I have examined age-related cognitive and perceptual changes, along with the compensatory processes older adults use to account for declines in these systems. My recent research looks at the connection between brain changes and cognitive changes in older adults as it relates to successes and impairments in memory performance. I use neuroimaging to elucidate the neural effects of control processes on memory across young and older adults. The goal of my research is to narrow the gap in our understanding of cognitive aging, with the concurrent aims of theory enhancement and supplying a knowledge base for future development of strategies to benefit memory in adult aging.My primary research interests are in perception, memory, and cognitive aging. I have examined age-related cognitive and perceptual changes, along with the compensatory processes older adults use to account for declines in these systems. My recent research looks at the connection between brain changes and cognitive changes in older adults as it relates to successes and impairments in memory performance. I use neuroimaging to elucidate the neural effects of control processes on memory across young and older adults. The goal of my research is to narrow the gap in our understanding of cognitive aging, with the concurrent aims of theory enhancement and supplying a knowledge base for future development of strategies to benefit memory in adult aging.My primary research interests are in perception, memory, and cognitive aging. I have examined age-related cognitive and perceptual changes, along with the compensatory processes older adults use to account for declines in these systems. My recent research looks at the connection between brain changes and cognitive changes in older adults as it relates to successes and impairments in memory performance. I use neuroimaging to elucidate the neural effects of control processes on memory across young and older adults. The goal of my research is to narrow the gap in our understanding of cognitive aging, with the concurrent aims of theory enhancement and supplying a knowledge base for future development of strategies to benefit memory in adult aging. - See more at: http://www.baycrest.org/research/rotman-research-institute/labs-and-programs/anderson-lab/#sthash.mmuX3mZG.dpuf

Education

  • 2014: Ph.D., Cognitive Neuroscience, Psychology, Brandeis University
  • 2010: M.A., Psychology, Brandeis University
  • 2009: B.A., Psychology, University of North Carolina Wilmington

Academic Appointments

  • 2014–Present: Postdoctoral Fellow, Rotman Research Institute, Toronto, Ontario

Distinctions and Awards

  • 2014: Verna Regan Award for Outstanding Teaching in Psychology, Brandeis University
  • 2011: The Abramson Family Fellowship, Brandeis University

Curriculum Vitae

Contact

3560 Bathurst Street
Toronto, ON M6A 2E1 Phone: 416-785-2500 ext. 3438 Email: alash@research.baycrest.org